Tag: writeonfighton

Happy Thanksgiving


When I look at the world and its hulking mountains, its sandy beaches, its flowered fields, its distant stars–I realize the world has enough stuff. When I look at myself and my loving and supportive family, my messy but comfortable home, my refrigerator full of food, my shelf full of books– I realize I have […]

The Danger of Not Telling Your Story


As a writer and a person with a degenerative brain condition, I often tumble into a state of what-will-they-say-about-me paranoia. A state where you hold your breath as you wrestle with the sinking feeling of eternal doom. What has helped me breathe and escape such doom is telling my story. I’ve learned that showing who […]

“So that’s what nipples are for!” A story about my 8 year old son


My niece Madison Katherine was born on Tuesday, September 18th. As Maddy stirred in her clear hospital-issued bin, my sister-in-law nodded, smiled, and politely announced it was feeding time. When I ushered my three kids out in the white-hospital hall Chase looked up at me with a pair of blue-honest eyes and asked, “Dad, how […]

Happy Diagnosis-versary! Why I celebrate my worst day


For the second year in a row I’m celebrating my worst day– September 4, 2013 with a homemade chocolate cake topped with vanilla icing and one of Springsteen’s most badass lines “Ain’t no sin to be glad you’re alive.” In fact, I made the same cake last year however, I’d like to believe this year’s […]

“Dad, why does summer go so fast?” ...and then there was 7 days of summer left


My 10 year old daughter, Haley, looks up from her iPad, sighs, and asks, “Dad, why does summer go so fast?” I laugh and say, ” Sweetie, I’ve been try to figure that out my whole life.” Maybe I’m getting older, but summer seems to pass quicker each year. If you’re like me, you started […]

Training Session #39- July 18: Are you your own worst enemy?


In 2013 I was diagnosed with sarcoidosis, an autoimmune disorder that chewed a hole in my cerebellum, atrophied various muscles, impaired my vision, balance, coordination and consequently stole my confidence and my ability to run. I have dedicated the summer of 2018 to regaining my strength, coordination, balance, and relearning how to run. I am participating […]

What You Need To Know About Men Who Have A Chronic Illness And The Shame They Feel  


The following post is part of the The January Project: Chronic Illness. A month long project where I research and write about chronic illness.  The information presented in this project is intended for educational purposes only. My hope is to increase awareness to help those living with chronic illness and to offer clarification to anyone […]

An excerpt from “The Wink”


Below is an excerpt from a story I wrote three years ago called “The Wink”. The story, set in 1994, recounts a championship baseball game I played in and serves as a tribute to my father. He turns 63 this week.  …At the height of the evening’s drama, dad looked down the first base line […]

What My Stand-Up Comedy “Career” Taught Me about Fear


It’s 2005 and I’m sitting at the kitchen table leafing through The Philadelphia Inquirer. Mom is at the stove whipping eggs. The coffee percolates and the TV weather man urges us to keep the umbrellas handy. Mom whirls around, offers me a plate of bacon and eggs and tussles my hair. I’m 25 and in a few weeks […]

2016 — A Year in Review: Questioning, Writing, Wearing the Ugliest Sweater I’ve Ever Seen and Celebrating the Only First Date I Would Ever Need


For me, it wasn’t long ago that the end of the year meant partying like a rock star deep into the suburban night followed by long, lazy stretches on the couch, burning afternoons away and watching an endless string of romantic comedies on TBS. But now, I’m proud to announce I’m a responsible adult (of […]