Training Session #42- July 22: Getting punched in the mouth

In 2013 I was diagnosed with sarcoidosis, an autoimmune disorder that chewed a hole in my cerebellum, atrophied various muscles, impaired my vision, balance, coordination and consequently stole my confidence and my ability to run. I have dedicated the summer of 2018 to regaining my strength, coordination, balance, and relearning how to run. I am participating in a 5k run on September 23rd in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This is my training journal.

This is my attempt to grow physically and mentally strong again.

Write on. Fight on.  

The previous training sessions can be found here, under “Fight on- Summer Training Log”


Time:

7:15 am- 8:20 am

Conditions:

Indoor

Training Maxim:

No hurry. No pause.

Training Performed:

Today I developed and conducted a circuit consisting of 8 different exercises. Each exercise was completed 4 times. The picture below shows the different equipment I used:

From left: Bosu Ball, 15 pound Kettlebell, 40 pound Barbell, exercise mat.

Bosu Ball:

  • 1 minute standing pose
  • 1 minute kneeling pose
  • push-ups- 10 reps

15 pound Kettlebell:

  • Swings -20 reps
  • Thrusters- (hold the Kettlebell in both hands, at your chest, squat, quickly stand up and press the Kettlebell overhead) 20 reps

40 pound Barbell:

  • Curls-10 reps
  • Military press-10 reps

Exercise mat:

  • Sit-ups-20 reps

Accomplishment:

Kneeling on the Bosu Ball for 1 minute without any assistance.

Quote I’m Thinking About Today:

“Stay committed to your decisions, but stay flexible in your approach.” ~ Tony Robbins

Reflection:

We’re all guilty of being boxers who want world titles without ever fighting.

I want the good life. A pain-free, stress-free, heartbreak-free life.  A life where I drain the marrow of the day until I fall asleep fat and happy and without scars.

But the moment we feel pain, whether emotional or physical, we forget the good life and focus on survival.

Like Mike Tyson famously said, “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.”

In a lot of ways, the moment after being punched in the mouth often predicts the future.

You’re on your knees. Blood dripping from your mouth and staining the canvas. Your ears ringing. The earth, and everything in it, is spinning. Your hurt and scared and you know the moment you rise, your opponent will be standing there, seething, smiling, ready to punch you again.

This is your defining moment. A moment that will teach you more about truth then a library of philosophy books.

The immediate choice is simple: stay down or get up. But the extended consequence of moment, of your choice, decides if you’ll ever have an opportunity to live the good life.

From The Previous Training Session- July 19: When you’re broken it’s easy to…

… give up.

… make excuses.

… place blame.

… complain.

… procrastinate.

… become angry.

… become jealous.

… become hopeless

… hide.

… forget that healing requires two things: action and love.

Training Session #41- July 21: When you’re broken it’s easy to…

In 2013 I was diagnosed with sarcoidosis, an autoimmune disorder that chewed a hole in my cerebellum, atrophied various muscles, impaired my vision, balance, coordination and consequently stole my confidence and my ability to run. I have dedicated the summer of 2018 to regaining my strength, coordination, balance, and relearning how to run. I am participating in a 5k run on September 23rd in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This is my training journal.

This is my attempt to grow physically and mentally strong again.

Write on. Fight on.  

The previous training sessions can be found here, under “Fight on- Summer Training Log”


Time:

7:02 am- 8:12 am

Conditions:

Outdoor – 71 degrees

Training Maxim:

No hurry. No pause.

Training Performed:

1 hour and 10 minutes of:

  • 1/2 mile walk
  • 10 sprints the length of a basketball court
  • 20 side shuffles ( from baseline to mid court)
  • Balance exercises- heel- toe ( sobriety walk), lunges, side steps
  • 100 push ups
  • 100 squats
  • 100 sit ups
  • 100 seconds of six inches ( legs extended and raised approximately 6 inches from the ground)

Accomplishment:

100 seconds of six inches. 40 of those seconds were achieved on one hold–to celebrate 40 days of training.

Quote I’m Thinking About Today:

“There is no goo day or bad day, only good and bad actions.” ~ Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Reflection:

When you’re broken it’s easy to…

… give up.

… make excuses.

… place blame.

… complain.

… procrastinate.

… become angry.

… become jealous.

… become hopeless

… hide.

… forget that healing requires two things: action and love.

From The Previous Training Session- July 19: What would your future self say about you right now?

When my alarm sounded at 5:45 am my first thoughts were excuses:

… but I’m tired.

… but my ankle is still tender from yesterday’s training.

… but I have a busy day today.

… but everyone in the house is still sleeping.

I turned off the alarm, stared at the ceiling fan and with my wife by my side warred with myself for almost 20 minutes

My present self wanted to sleep. He wanted the pillow and the soft sheets.

My future self wanted to lace up the sneakers and get outside and train.

I find myself divided like this a lot. The present self wants the relaxation. While the future self wants the tribulation.

With my wife still by my side and the ceiling fan still spinning,I took a deep breath and thought about climbing back into bed tonight.  Would I be the same person that woke up this morning or would I be a little stronger, a little more proud because I simply got out of bed and dedicated time to improving myself?

So I pulled myself out of bed, laced up my sneakers and stepped into the world at 6:30 this morning.

I didn’t want to.

But now, as I’m telling you this, I’m so glad I did.

 

Training Session #40- July 19: What would your future self say about you right now?

In 2013 I was diagnosed with sarcoidosis, an autoimmune disorder that chewed a hole in my cerebellum, atrophied various muscles, impaired my vision, balance, coordination and consequently stole my confidence and my ability to run. I have dedicated the summer of 2018 to regaining my strength, coordination, balance, and relearning how to run. I am participating in a 5k run on September 23rd in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This is my training journal.

This is my attempt to grow physically and mentally strong again.

Write on. Fight on.  

The previous training sessions can be found here, under “Fight on- Summer Training Log”


Time:

6:20 am- 6:55 am

Conditions:

Outdoor – 67 degrees

Training Maxim:

No hurry. No pause.

Training Performed:

35 minutes of walking- 1.5 miles

Accomplishment:

Getting out bed and training, even knowing tomorrow is a scheduled rest day.

Quote I’m Thinking About Today:

“The world breaks everyone, and afterward, many are strong at the broken places.” ~ Ernest Hemingway

Reflection:

When my alarm sounded at 5:45 am my first thoughts were excuses:

… but I’m tired.

… but my ankle is still tender from yesterday’s training.

… but I have a busy day today.

… but everyone in the house is still sleeping.

I turned off the alarm, stared at the ceiling fan and with my wife by my side warred with myself for almost 20 minutes

My present self wanted to sleep. He wanted the pillow and the soft sheets.

My future self wanted to lace up the sneakers and get outside and train.

I find myself divided like this a lot. The present self wants the relaxation. While the future self wants the tribulation.

With my wife still by my side and the ceiling fan still spinning,I took a deep breath and thought about climbing back into bed tonight.  Would I be the same person that woke up this morning or would I be a little stronger, a little more proud because I simply got out of bed and dedicated time to improving myself?

So I pulled myself out of bed, laced up my sneakers and stepped into the world at 6:30 this morning.

I didn’t want to.

But now, as I’m telling you this, I’m so glad I did.

Excerpt From The Previous Training Session- July 19: Are you your own worst enemy?

Do you struggle to get out you own way?

Today I did, very literally.  During training I kept kicking myself while I jogging. ‘

Below is a picture of my right ankle. (It’s not the prettiest ankle so please reserve all judgments.)

Notice on the medial malleolus (aka the bony knob that sticks out the side of your ankle) there is an open cut and the skin is irritated around the cut. This is where I kept kicking myself. Also, to the left of the cut is a four inch scar from reconstructive ankle surgery I had in 2013. And 5 years post-surgery, the skin around the scar is still sensitive which made the kicking a little more enjoyable.

So why when jogging today did my leg left foot keep kicking my right ankle?

 

 

Training Session #39- July 18: Are you your own worst enemy?

In 2013 I was diagnosed with sarcoidosis, an autoimmune disorder that chewed a hole in my cerebellum, atrophied various muscles, impaired my vision, balance, coordination and consequently stole my confidence and my ability to run. I have dedicated the summer of 2018 to regaining my strength, coordination, balance, and relearning how to run. I am participating in a 5k run on September 23rd in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This is my training journal.

This is my attempt to grow physically and mentally strong again.

Write on. Fight on.  

The previous training sessions can be found here, under “Fight on- Summer Training Log”


Time:

6:20 am- 7:05 am

Conditions:

Outdoor – 70 degrees

Training Maxim:

No hurry. No pause.

Training Performed:

45 minutes of walking/jogging intervals- 2.2 miles

Accomplishment:

Jogging the distance between 3 suburban street lights posts during the run x 3 (a new suburban street light post distance record) and finishing the run with a .25 mile jog.

Quote I’m Thinking About Today:

“In any case you mustn’t confuse a single failure with a final defeat.” F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tender is the Night 

Reflection:

Are you your own worst enemy?

Do you struggle to get out you own way?

Today I did, very literally.  During training I kept kicking myself while I jogging. ‘

Below is a picture of my right ankle. (It’s not the prettiest ankle so please reserve all judgments.)

Notice on the medial malleolus (aka the bony knob that sticks out the side of your ankle) there is an open cut and the skin is irritated around the cut. This is where I kept kicking myself. Also, to the left of the cut is a four inch scar from reconstructive ankle surgery I had in 2013. And 5 years post-surgery, the skin around the scar is still sensitive which made the kicking a little more enjoyable.

So why when jogging today did my leg left foot keep kicking my right ankle?

I don’t know. I didn’t want this to keep happening. I didn’t repeatedly kick myself just so I would have something to write about today.

My logical explanation is that my brain damage affected the left side of my body more than my right, causing my left limbs to sometimes act infantile and do what they want.

I tried slowing down my pace. Speeding up. Pushing my left stride away from my body. Nothing worked. I couldn’t stop kicking myself.

It may sound weird but I hope you can relate.

Do you struggle to get out of your own way? Do you often beat yourself up over your actions? Over things that you can’t control? Do you destructively meddle in your own life and wound yourself physically, emotionally?

Training has taught me that the person inside is often our greatest enemy. And too easily we hand over our power to the critic stationed in our brain.

Overcoming yourself is a matter of love. Of simply loving yourself more. Not in a destructive, narcissistic way. But loving yourself the way you love your imperfect children or spouse. Despite their imperfections, their wounds and flaws, you still look at them with soft eyes and say, “I love you.”

Do you look at yourself the same way? Maybe you should. Maybe you’ll realize that kicking yourself is simply another imperfection in a life littered with imperfections.

And maybe it’s our imperfections, not our perfections, that make our story worth sharing.

Excerpt From The Previous Training Session- July 17: Breaking the “I can’t” Habit

Growing up, I remember my father saying how much he hated the phrase, “I can’t.” Mostly, because my brothers and I said it all the time.

I can’t do the dishes.

I can’t make my bed.

I can’t do my homework. 

My father would say if he had a dollar for all the times he heard someone say “I can’t” he’d be a rich man by now.

Training Session #38- July 17: Breaking the “I Can’t” Habit

In 2013 I was diagnosed with sarcoidosis, an autoimmune disorder that chewed a hole in my cerebellum, atrophied various muscles, impaired my vision, balance, coordination and consequently stole my confidence and my ability to run. I have dedicated the summer of 2018 to regaining my strength, coordination, balance, and relearning how to run. I am participating in a 5k run on September 23rd in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This is my training journal.

This is my attempt to grow physically and mentally strong again.

Write on. Fight on.  

The previous training sessions can be found here, under “Fight on- Summer Training Log”


Time:

6:25 am- 7:30 am

Conditions:

Indoor

Training Maxim:

No hurry. No pause.

Training Performed:

  • Chest press 3 reps x 10 ea.- 100 lbs
  • Shoulder press 3 reps x 10 ea.-70 lbs
  • Inverted row 3 reps x 10- 70 lbs
  • 60 Kettle Bell swings- 15 lbs
  • Leg Press 3 reps x  10 each leg- 50 lbs right, 40 lbs left
  • Leg extension 3 reps x 10 50 lbs
  • Balance exercises on a Bosu Ball including: step-ups, stand upright on the ball with my eyes closed, squats on the ball

Accomplishment:

Today I rotated between the Kettle Bell swings and balance exercises on the Bosu Ball. The Kettle Bell swings tired my legs which made the Bosu Ball exercises more demanding.

Quote I’m Thinking About Today:

“The most effective way to do it, is to do it.”~ Amelia Earhart

Reflection:

Growing up, I remember my father saying how much he hated the phrase, “I can’t.” Mostly, because my brothers and I said it all the time.

I can’t do the dishes.

I can’t make my bed.

I can’t do my homework. 

My father would say if he had a dollar for all the times he heard someone say “I can’t” he’d be a rich man by now.

“I can’t” is a habit. A habit about as productive as biting your nails or picking your nose.

If the first step in stopping any habit is identifying when you’re engaged in the habit, take note the next time you say, “I can’t”.

Write down what you can’t do. Make a list of all the reasons why you can’t do it. Then another list of reasons why you can do it. Throw away the list of  “I can’ts”. Pin the list of “I can’s” on the refrigerator. Start doing the thing you can’t do and send my father a dollar.

Excerpt From The Previous Training Session- July 15: Before you quit today…

How about a sentence you probably don’t hear enough: Someone, somewhere needs you.

It’s impossible to go through life without forging one positive relationship. And though today may feel like your crawling through a mile long shitfield and it’s cold and it’s raining and you lost your shoes and a pack of hungry wolves stand wide-eyed at the edge of the field– don’t give up.

Because someone, somewhere is watching, reading, and listening and they need you.

Training Session #37- July 16: Before you quit today…

In 2013 I was diagnosed with sarcoidosis, an autoimmune disorder that chewed a hole in my cerebellum, atrophied various muscles, impaired my vision, balance, coordination and consequently stole my confidence and my ability to run. I have dedicated the summer of 2018 to regaining my strength, coordination, balance, and relearning how to run. I am participating in a 5k run on September 23rd in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This is my training journal.

This is my attempt to grow physically and mentally strong again.

Write on. Fight on.  

The previous training sessions can be found here, under “Fight on- Summer Training Log”


Time:

5:59 am – 6:44 am

Conditions:

Outdoor- 77 degrees

Training Maxim:

No hurry. No pause.

Training Performed:

45 minutes of jogging /walking intervals

Accomplishment:

For the first time since I began training, I jogged up one of the hills on my training route.  Below is a picture of the hill jogged. The picture was taken during a previous training session.

Quote I’m Thinking About Today:

“I can’t go on. I’ll go on.” ~ Samuel Beckett

Reflection:

Before you quit today…

How about a sentence you probably don’t hear enough: Someone, somewhere needs you.

It’s impossible to go through life without forging one positive relationship. And though today may feel like your crawling through a mile long shitfield and it’s cold and it’s raining and you lost your shoes and a pack of hungry wolves stand wide-eyed at the edge of the field– don’t give up.

Because someone, somewhere is watching, reading, and listening and they need you.

Because someone, somewhere is holding on because you’re holding on. And if you let go and quit, so will they, and if they let go and quit, so will someone else and so on, until a whole community of hopeful people let go and quit.

Keep training, keep writing, keep studying, keep praying, keep working, keep searching, keep listening, keep practicing, keep honesty, keep patience, keep calm and persevere.

Because if you quit today you’ll crush a community tomorrow. And you may realize quitting would be the most selfish thing you could do.

Excerpt From The Previous Training Session- July 15: How do you satisfy your fear?

When I was a kid I would complain to my father, “Dad, I’m hungry.”

He would look down, smile, and reply, “Hi hungry, I’m dad.”

When we declare, whether publicly or privately, that we’re hungry it’s hard to focus on anything else but food.

But for most of us finding enough food to eat until we’re full and satisfied is not a problem.

Fear works the same way as hunger. If you declare, “I’m afraid” it’s impossible to think of anything but your fear.

But how do you satisfy your fear?

 

Training Session #36- July 14: How do you satisfy your fear?

In 2013 I was diagnosed with sarcoidosis, an autoimmune disorder that chewed a hole in my cerebellum, atrophied various muscles, impaired my vision, balance, coordination and consequently stole my ability to run. I have dedicated the summer of 2018 to regaining my strength, coordination, balance, and relearning how to run. I am participating in a 5k run on September 23rd in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This is my training journal. This is my attempt to grow physically strong again.

Write on. Fight on.  

The previous training sessions can be found here, under “Fight on- Summer Training Log”


Time:

7:00 am to 8:15 am

Conditions:

Indoor

Training Maxim:

No hurry. No pause.

Training Performed:

  • Chest press 3 reps x 10 ea.- 90 lbs
  • Shoulder press 3 reps x 10 ea.-70 lbs
  • Inverted row 3 reps x 10- 70 lbs
  • 60 Kettle bell swings- 15 lbs
  • 80 abdominal crunches
  • Balance exercises on a Bosu Ball including: step-ups, stand upright on the ball with my eyes closed, squats on the ball

This is a Bosu Ball:

Accomplishment:

Training on the Bosu Ball.

I have noticed the Bosu Ball in the corner of the gym for some time now, yet I have been hesitant to train on it. What if I fall–in front of strangers?  But today I used it (and didn’t fall) which was a big accomplishment for me.

Quote I’m Thinking About Today:

“Tell your heart that the fear of suffering is worse than the suffering itself. And that no heart has ever suffered when it goes in search of its dreams, because every second of the search is a second’s encounter with God and with eternity.” ~Paulo Coelho, The Alchemist 

Reflection:

When I was a kid I would complain to my father, “Dad, I’m hungry.”

He would look down, smile, and reply, “Hi hungry, I’m dad.”

When we declare, whether publicly or privately, that we’re hungry it’s hard to focus on anything else but food.

But for most of us finding enough food to eat until we’re full and satisfied is not a problem.

Fear works the same way as hunger. If you declare, “I’m afraid” it’s impossible to think of anything but your fear.

But how do you satisfy your fear?

The legend of actor Henry Fonda is this: even at 75 years old, after appearing in over 100 films, television shows, and stage productions Henry Fonda threw up every time before he went on stage. When he was finished, he would stand up, clean his face, take a drink of water and go on stage.

Despite his fear, Henry Fonda satisfied his fear by doing the thing he was afraid to do–going on stage.

Like hunger, fear will only grow stronger, more consuming the longer we ignore it.

Treat fear like hunger.

“I’m afraid.”

So eat. Satiate your appetite by taking action. Know that the only thing that will satisfy your fear is doing the thing you’re afraid to do.

Exercise, start your book, put down the bottle, have that conversation. Do the thing you’re afraid to do and over time you will find yourself full.

Excerpt From The Previous Training Session- July 14: The Thing about the Voice in Your Head

But what does your voice say when things get hard? When the distance between you and your goal is too far? When the pain is too great? When the cancer is terminal? When hope and happiness and love have left?